Sustainability

Why does hemp clothing make sense?

All stages in the production of hemp clothing have vast selling points. From the grower to the manufacturer and for the wearer, the benefits are extensive. It’s surprising then that hemp clothing hasn’t been given the same mainstream treatment as other natural fibrous materials such as cotton. Although it is starting to make some headway in that regard.

With the advent of the CBD industry advertising and as the general populous become more educated about cannabis, the word hemp seems to have completely lost all of the potential negative connotations some people have previously associated with marijuana. This has undoubtedly created a way for the hemp clothing market to boom, and this has not gone unnoticed as is seen from hemp clothing ranges from popular fashion outlets.

So, why does the world of hemp fashion make so much sense?

For the growers…

The benefits for those growing hemp oil crop astonishing. Hemp grows almost anywhere and has been found all over the globe from the Arctic to Australia. This means hemp can be grown locally to wherever it’s needed. This reduces transportation costs which lowers emissions as well as putting the power back into the local economy.

Hemp also grows extremely quickly compared to other plants used for fibre, is known to grow twice as quickly as cotton, which instantly makes it twice as efficient, producing more clothes in a shorter period of time. It also replenishes the soil with nutrients, preventing topsoil erosion which means less fallow periods meaning more time, money and resources are saved.


Hemp also requires zero harmful chemicals such as fertilizers, pesticides or herbicides to grow. This is a win for the environment as well as for our own health, as these chemicals have been known to make their way into our food and water. Hemp is also an extremely sustainable crop and it has multiple other uses than clothing such as building materials, fuels, food and as a medicine.

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For the manufacturers…

For those manufacturing and subsequently selling a product, it needs to tick all the boxes for consumers for it to become popular. So, for clothing, this means the product must be fit for purpose by keeping you warm or cool depending on your environment whilst also being fashionable to some degree whilst having unique selling points. Boxes that hemp ticks.

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Hemp is an extremely versatile fabric, meaning it is fit for multiple weather conditions meaning any hemp garments can be worn all year round. In addition to this, lots of high-street fashion outlets have begun to manufacture hemp clothing, bringing different styles and designs to suit a variety of fashion requirements. Hemp products also have the unique selling point of being eco-friendly.

For the wearer…

The benefits for the wearer are what will truly sell hemp clothing to people from all demographics. So, it's a good reason it has plenty. Hemp is a naturally strong fibre, much stronger than cotton, for example, meaning the clothing is less likely to rip and it is therefore extremely durable. It is also amorphous, meaning it’s good at keeping its shape after multiple washes.

It is also naturally UV protectant and is extremely soft. It also gets softer with time as the fibres soften after being washed. It is water absorbent meaning that it will keep you dry in rain whilst being breathable to keep you cool in the summer.

Final thoughts on hemp clothing

Hemp was once a plant that was used all around the world for multiple different reasons. These reasons seemed to dip out of the mainstream whilst the war on drugs stigmatised anything associated with cannabis.

Now the benefits of hemp are being spread like they always should have been and we are starting to see more and more hemp clothing brands making it into the mainstream.

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Michael Quinn

Michael is a 27-year-old Chemistry graduate from Stoke-on-Trent, England. When he’s not writing he’s travelling to music venues across the country with his sound-system

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